Agile delivers better Quality

In a series of posts I’m going to examine some of the claimed benefits of agile methods – are they justified? My first post looked at the cost of development with agile, while the second discussed speed. Here we address quality. Commentators often say agile methods are not suitable for life or mission critical systems – for some reason they believe the quality cannot be delivered reliably using agile. But there is a growing opinion that agile methods can deliver even better quality than planned approaches. I believe it’s not anything inherent in agile methods that can lead to lower quality, rather it is a lack of discipline in applying the method. Discipline is required to ensure high quality in any method, agile or not. Unfortunatly agile is perceived by some (unjustly) as not demanding discipline, and hence not ensuring consistent quality. Here are some reasons I think an informed, mindful and disciplined agile method can be considered more reliable in terms of quality than planned methods:

  • Quality is built in – not added afterwards: Iterative development encourages continuous test – at a minimum every iteration. In agile methods with automated test, this is increased to daily, or even hourly, or every time the code base changes. With test driven development, tests are developed and executed even before the development begins.  This encourages quality coding from the outset, and the repeated and up front emphasis on testing engenders a quality culture in the team
  • Waterfall methods seperate responsibility for development and test – they encourage an antagonistic relationship between developers under pressure to churn out features and QA who have the lonely job of policing the quality of the system.
  • QA is normally the last major task in a waterfall model, following requirements, analysis, design and development. Therefore, it is usually conducted in limited time and under severe pressure at the end of the project – conditions not conducive to rigorous and insightful test.

But quality is not confined to the coded implementation itself:

  • The quality of requirements are improved through close customer collaboration and face to face interaction. Detailed requirements are determined only when required, just before implementation, and therefore involve less ‘future gazing’. Requirements are described in a user centric fashion, and can be better understood by the customer than more technology centric descriptions usual in traditional methods.
  • The quality of the plan, and therefore the predictability of the project, is improved through continuous replanning for each iteration, by addressing high importance and high risk items early on (eg integration) and by the transparency offered by measuring progress through ‘done’ features and the value they represent to the business.
  • The quality of experience for stakeholders is improved: customers who get what they want earlier, sponsors who get happier customers, product management who get better visibility and more options for managing the development, and developers and testers who get a more motivating and sustainable work experience.

Taken together, I believe agile can deliver better quality software than planned methods. Agile is rooted in lean thinking, a set of philosophical tools that helped Japanese companies reach new levels of manufacturing and product development quality over several decades.  However, discipline in their application, as with any method, is not optional.

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